Lori Moore

Lori Moore works on one of her acrylic paintings at the Ohio District 5 Area Agency on Aging facility.

ONTARIO -- When life gives you lemons, make lemonade. Lori (Loretta) Moore, 75, has taken this proverbial phrase one step further to say, "make lemon meringue pie."

"That's what I've done my entire life," the Ontario resident said.

As she sees it, the key to a sweeter life is positivity.

And if you've met Moore, you'd know that she's the epitome of positivity.

She inherited her optimistic outlook from her father.

"It was like living with Bob Hope," she said with a laugh.

He taught her to always seek the good in people and remember that each morning you have a choice.

"You can either get up and say, 'Good morning, Lord!' Or you could say, 'Good Lord, it's morning,'" she said.

When it comes to positive aging, she suggests, "Keep busy and and go after those things you never had time for perhaps when you were working."

The Australian Psychological Society defines positive aging as “the process of maintaining a positive attitude, feeling good about yourself, keeping fit and healthy, and engaging fully in life as you age."

Positive aging is promoted here in the area with the Positive Aging Expo, an annual event hosted by the Ohio District 5 Area Agency on Aging aimed at connecting the aging population with resources to continue enjoying a high quality of life.

Moore, who studied art in college at the University of Cincinnati, meets weekly with other seniors 60 and over at the Ohio District 5 Area Agency on Aging office in Ontario to work on art projects.

She credits her mother for her artistic flair, who was an art teacher at Genoa High School for 30 years.

"I was more or less born with the ability," she said.

While raising her three sons up by Lake Erie with her late husband, Dave, she worked out of the home as a photo editor.

"I'm back to acrylics now," she said, pointing to her fish painting.

In addition to art, Moore sings Broadway hits at various nursing homes and events and performs with a dance troupe called Strut Your Stuff, which includes 12 women who range in age from 69 to 84.

Her eight grandchildren also keep her busy, she said.

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One of her secrets to feeling good is dressing up every single day.

"I think if you look good you feel good," she said.

She was a bit dismayed when she was unable to wear high heels after an injury last year, but even then she was able find humor in the situation.

She broke her ankle after losing her balance when a dog ran into her.

"Here's the best part, my specialist, her name was Bark," she said. "I just started laughing. I couldn't believe it."

Some people may turn their nose up at maintaining such a positive perspective, but not Moore. 

"With hardships, you just have to try to look for the positives," she said. "Three years ago I had my hip replaced. Zero pain.

"You just gotta ask the Lord for faith. I think the Bible is your best way of staying healthy. It's worked for me."

This Solutions Journalism story is brought to you in part by the generous support of our Newsroom Partners: SpherionVisiting Nurses AssociationPR Machine WorksNanogate/Jay SystemsDRM ProductionsOhioHealth Mansfield HospitalRichland BankMechanics BankArea Agency on Aging, and many others. To learn more about Solutions Journalism at Richland Source follow this link.

This Solutions Journalism story is brought to you in part by the generous support of our Newsroom Partners: Spherion, Visiting Nurses Association, PR Machine Works, Nanogate/Jay Systems, DRM Productions, OhioHealth Mansfield Hospital, Richland Bank, Mechanics Bank, Area Agency on Aging, and many others. To learn more about Solutions Journalism at Richland Source click the "About Solutions Journalism."
 

Thrive Reporter

Thrive reporter. Graduate of Ontario High School and Ohio State Mansfield. Wife. Mom. Dog lover. Fitness enthusiast. Plant collector. Mac and cheese consumer.