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Native Son

A Menagerie of Mansfield Manufacturing

Menagerie of Mansfield Manufacturing

If you step in to the urban environment of downtown Mansfield today looking for wild animals you don’t have to hunt far to find lions, giraffes, bears, even ostriches…on the Carrousel.

If you had made that same search a hundred years ago there was no merry-go-round to provide exotic fauna, yet there was abundant evidence of wildlife downtown: on the broadsides, placards and signboards advertising various products made in Mansfield.

In 1915 Mansfield was known for—and easily identified by—a goat, a rooster, two dogs, some hunting horses, an eagle, and a pair of bunnies. This photo essay assembles a bestiary of those critters that once represented our town to the wide world of American consumers.

Starving rooster of Aultman & Taylor

Making farm implements, the Aultman & Taylor Company had a starving rooster for its logo.

The Renner & Weber Co. eagle logo

Renner & Weber inherited the big bird when they took over the Eagle Brewery.

Bang Tail cigars from the Bissman Company

The Bissman Company imported and manufactured cigars under the name Bang Tails.

Bill William the billy goat

Bill William cigars from Mansfield had a famous mascot commonly seen around town.

Two Rovers who won't bite

Tracy & Avery imported and manufactured cigars, one brand was promoted by a pair of dogs.

Two Bunnies

Tracy & Avery went into the cigar manufacturing business with their own Two Bunnies brand.

A Galion critter

A noble buck from the flour mill in Galion.

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Timothy Brian McKee is a featured columnist on our site every Sunday with a column titled Native SonEvery Tuesday, he taps into his knowledge and collection of historical photos and bring us Then & Now, a brief glance at the way things were.